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    Thanks Ashley! Getting good initial feedback... And even growing a little in this first week.

     

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      Launching is half the work! Congratulations and I hope you achieve all of your startup endeavors. 

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        Thanks!! So far, going really well. (But communities are a long journey!)

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        Congrats on the launch Brendan 🎉

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          Thanks, Hrishikesh! It went off without much of a hitch. Great attendance, good conversation, already looking forward to Saturday's Office Hours session.

          B2B Sales Conversation - Opening Slide

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            Amazing stuff - more power to you!

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          Well done! I love seeing the growth.

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            LinkedIn as it's a great place to establish authentic conversations!!

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              Cool! How do you create those conversations?

               

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                I make an intentional effort to get to know the people in my network. One of my favorite things to do is to connect people to what they are looking for, so I do some preliminary research by reading their profile etc, and then reach out with a voice memo saying how excited I am to connect with them! That usually starts the conversation off in a beautiful way!!

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                  I do the same with Twitter. DMs are invaluable.

                   

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              Great thread, Brendan!

              I would persoanlly choose Twitter over LinkedIn. Overall, the quality of content & engagement is amazing on Twitter. Twitter has its own problems (for instance, I see a lot of unconstructive, negative arguments & debates on Twitter) but it's relatively much better.

              There's a good amount of noise on LinkedIn, plus, I don't see people engaging on posts much. Also, people abuse connect requests a lot. I have been getting so many sales pitches (most of them templated) in the recent months.

              Having said that, LinkedIn is still a huge platform and I have personally seen it work. For instance, we saw spike in signups on Remote Clan via LinkedIn and I got almost all of the subscribers to my personal newsletter from there.

              My Twitter handle: Hrishikesh :)

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                There are ways you can really curate your feed so that Twitter is entirely useful and there isn't much noise or hostility. I've been really successful at that so far.


                I'm also having a lot of great conversations with prospects and customers now through Twitter. DMs​ are the best feature in Twitter​, and I probably have DM conversations with several dozen people every week. As a sales guy, that's ideal.


                I'm fascinated to learn more about how you made LinkedIn effective. You should probably write a short thread on that here.​ ​

                In fact, I would really like to use it to make ​people on ​LinkedIn​ aware of​ the Twitter course we are launching next month. It would be a great way to jump start their Twitter engagement. Any advice you can share?​

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                  Absolutely, and it's way more tougher to clean your feed on LinkedIn.

                  True, I have had great conversations on LinkedIn DMs too, but the amount of spam is huge.

                  That's great! For such cases, I have realised engagement posts work well on LinkedIn where you ask interested to comment on the post. It helps a lot with the reach. Karthik has actually written a detailed article about LinkedIn posts - this should definitely help.

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                    Nice article, Karthik!

                    I go back to the rule that you should focus on one channel, and Twitter is so much more efficient. And serendipitous! Here's an example. I commented late to a thread because it was squarely in my area of expertise, and the response is better than anything I get on LinkedIn. And it took a minute to write.

                    https://twitter.com/brendanmcadams/status/1375269382717341701?s=20

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                I think the answer depends on your goal; work related - to finding customers? or to be around the startup community and find potential investors or partners?    

                In my experience, Linkedin works better for finding leads and Twitter to be social into the ecosystem I'm interested in. 

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                  In my experience, Twitter is better for both. LinkedIn has developed a pretty established reputation for being spammy.

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                  ✅ Twitter for sure

                  Since last year, I have been actively using Twitter. Whenever I open my news feed, there is always something new for me to read and learn (Huge fan of informational threads!)
                  Found Twitter to be very supportive and people are willing to help each other. 

                  Even though I use LinkedIn regularly, I personally think the content on the site isn't very great. Have come across numerous spammy posts. Still, it is a great website for finding jobs.

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                    Totally agree. I started out using Twitter as a news service, and it's great for that. But it does reward people that engage and help others out.​ ​

                    I have made a bunch of new friends through the various conversations, which ha​s​ turned out to be a very pleasant surprise!​ (Another reason why we are doing the course... Learning communities are a fantastic way to meet new people and make new connections.)

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                    Great topic. Getting back to a research 93%of companies are using Linkedin, in their recruiting process, while candidates spend 68% of their time in social media including FB, Instagram, and Twitter and only 18% of potential candidates are daily on LinkedIn.

                    I would definitely allocate more of the resources and time on social media upon the industry, social media penetration in the niche.

                     

                    Suggest reading more about that here

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                      That's an intersting observation. LinkedIn gets ~75% of revenues from recruiting...so I thnk it skews things in that direction. 

                      I'm not interested in getting a job. I want to have customer conversations.... which is much easier on Twitter.

                      B.

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                        That is basically a strategy to recruit, not getting hired

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                          Not suer I understand, but no worries.

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                      I got on Twitter relatively late (2017) but have quickly found it to be a great platform for gaining information relevant to me and my interests; connecting with people and organizations that are interesting; and just learning and being entertained in general.

                      Conversely, I've been on LinkedIn longer, use it as a professional rolodex and newsfeed, but am increasingly finding the information I get from the platform not particularly useful. I do still find value in my public network, but it's recently felt like there's been a drop in quality in terms of authentic engagement overall (everything seems to be treated like a sales opportunity). For example, of the last 10 connection requests I receive, 8 are from people I've never met and are sent with messages that are almost certainly automation.

                      As such, if asked to pick one, I'd definitely keep Twitter 🐦

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                        Spot on. LinkedIn as a rolodex for me, too. And it's too slow to do anything. Twitter is much faster, more efficient. And more of my customers (early-stage startups, founders) are there.

                        BTW, you need to add your twitter handle to your profile here. Can't follow you otherwise...

                        Thanks, Justin!

                        Brendan

                         

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                          Pour vous @ahn_going 👋

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                        Hey Hrishikesh!!

                        Thank you for the shout-out! And yes, things have been busy here.... but it's time to come back to the Clan.

                        I've been working on some B2B courses lately... have a course for founders that will launch in early May, and I'm doing a course on how grow the right Twitter audience for business people. We're officially launching it later today, but heck... here's a link that explains the course.

                        This is the first cohort, so it's in the "Just Ship" mindset, but it should be valuable for those looking to build the right Twitter audience.

                        I'd love feedback from the group on this, too! We're pricing it low for early adopters ($49 for 30 days) but plan to bump the price up at various thresholds.

                        Thanks again, and Clan members... please share your thoughts!

                        Brendan

                         

                        PS - I'm a Gumroad investor, too!! 

                         

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                          AND WE'RE LIVE!!!

                          TWITTER AUDIENCE GROWTH FOR BUSINESS AND SALES

                          Please provide feedback, or hit me if you have questions.

                          Thanks all!!

                          Brendan

                           

                           

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                            Congrats, Brendan. It’s a great time to launch this course since a huge number of people are looking to grow their Twitter audience.

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                              Thanks, Sarah!

                              Quick question... How about using Twitter for sales? Do you think people are interested in that? I've had really excellent success engaging with prospects and customers, and so that's part the focus of the course. And growing the right audience (so you're not getting cat video fans among your followers...unless you want cat video fans, that is.)

                              B.

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                                Hey Brendan, I just checked out the course website and it looks impressive! 

                                Yes, Twitter is a great way to interact with prospects and build an audience. Although I haven't explored much, the idea of using Twitter as a sales channel is quite interesting. 

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                            Thanks, Hrishikesh! I am in fact cranking away at my 250 word essays... It's a good challenge.

                            And I need to get back into it here at the RC. I miss you guys!

                            Brendan

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                              It's a good topic and worth discussing. 

                              In my experience, it depends. If you're doing the more tedious work (like the translating example) or you don't have any way of bracketing the scope, then hourly makes sense. 

                              But for projects where you can clearly define the deliverable and manage expectations, a fixed fee is a better model IF you can explain your costs as a percetnage of the overall ROI. They spend X on you and get 4X in revenue or cost savings, for example. And the more of the same thing you're able to do, and reuse past materials and effort to accomplish the project, the easier it is to move your proposals towards this approach.

                              There's a lot to this discussion and there are a lot of things to consider it you move towards fixed-price engagements (that's all I do), but it is definitely worth it for the right project(s). Please reach out if you have questions.

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                                A bit off-topic but I noticed from the link that you may be based in Baltimore/Maryland, Brendan? I'm a Montgomery County native myself!

                                Excuse this post if you're not actually based in Maryland 😅

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                                  Yep! Based in Baltimore!

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                                  And it applies to sales, too. This is a chapter directly from my book. So...yes, it's a necessity.

                                  ======================================

                                  What’s Plan B?

                                  What could possibly go wrong? The self-help, positive-thinking crowd would suggest that you should always focus on the ideal outcome, force all negative thoughts from your being and imagine total, limitless success. Which is fine, up to a point.

                                  But another way to think about things is to step up and ask yourself, “What can go wrong?” Sure, your solution is the best option for the customer. Yes, the client has all but signed. Still, in that moment, take some time and try to imagine all the ways your deal could go sideways. 

                                  This isn’t a prescription for worry or a suggestion that you’re being too easy on yourself. Rather, taking time to imagine disaster has the curious effect of making it less likely. 

                                  Think about applying this tactic at the various stages of every deal. Make it part of your standard practice. Ask yourself what could go wrong. Where are the problems, weaknesses and unknowns? How could you lose the deal? Who is against you? What needs to happen for disaster to strike?

                                  Use NASA as an example. There’s arguably no more skeptical, worrisome, hand-wringing crowd on the planet. They spend tens of thousands of hours trying to anticipate all the disastrous, life-threatening events that could befall any project. Most of them never come to pass. Fewer still don’t have a solution already in place. 

                                  Salespeople seldom formalize this ‘imagine a deal-breaking calamity’ component of the sales process. The result is, there’s no Plan B when a calamity does strike. There’s no deft recovery because nobody could imagine the need for one. Until there is. 

                                  The interesting aspect of the NASA philosophy regarding serious problems is that they’re made less serious simply because they’ve already planned for them. By anticipating the problem, they’ve given themselves the time to resolve it beforehand. It’s not even really a surprise. It’s just another step, another plan that needs to be executed. 

                                  Make a habit of asking what can go wrong before it does, and then having a Plan B becomes second nature.

                                  You won’t need it. Probably.

                                   

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                                    Well said Brendan. I agree, in any meeting where new ideas are discussed, we actually encourage the presenter to share a few points under "Why would this idea not work".

                                    Now the point is to not discourage the person but to rather analyse the idea from various different angles. Typically, we see that people are able to suggest problems with their own ideas and have also thought of solutions to them. This makes them even more confident in presenting the idea because they are able to predict any objections that might be raised.

                                    This also gives others the avenue to pitch in with solutions to the problems presented.

                                    Having said that, I also push people to assess the cost of a mistake. If it is quite low, preparing for contingencies is just more costly. As a startup, we need to know where to not obsess with perfection.

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                                    In the theme of marketing to a noble idea.... https://mashable.com/article/patagonia-vote-the-assholes-out-tag/

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                                      Well done, folks!

                                      @abbeypatterson-525, do you think you could post a 'lessons learned' on your LinkedIn discussion? I for one would be curious about how to do that and what to watch out for.

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                                        Hi Brendan,

                                        We do use a custom form on which we use a product like Crazyegg that gives us details on how the user interacted on the website and the form too. This gives us some details on their thought process and the journey.

                                        Then we look for the individual's Linkedin profile to get more details about the individual and also the company. We typically like to deal with tech individuals, so that tellls us whether the person is the best fit for us from a client perspective.

                                        We then have an introductory mail sent to them with a couple of questions so that we can give them a customised solution. The reply gives us even more context on whether the client is a good fit for us.

                                        Hope this was helpful.

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                                          This is great, John. Particularly that it's such a well-defined process. And it's simple, understandable, and easy to execute on. Well done!

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                                          Hey Brendan, Would love to present my answer on this, but I guess the link is broken :/

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                                            Hey Cathy, I have sorted that out. You can look at the link now :))

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                                              I hope we can get that feedback now... thanks!

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                                                Thanks, Karthik!

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                                                  As I am a freelancer, the primary thing that I do is to gather as much information as possible about the client/org. That includes things such as the company size, work culture, revenues and sometimes even funding. For collecting these details, I search for data from other websites such as LinkedIn, Glassdoor, Trustpilot and Crunchbase. This helps me understand whether it is a deal worth pursuing.

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                                                Karthik's argument is a very good one. Getting the world to see things differently can be very expensive.

                                                I would add that energy focused on an 'enemy' is an interesting approach if the enemy is an idea (e.g. software, pollution, etc.) rather than another competitor. A variation on this theme is to craft your sales messanging to appeal to these noble intentions in your prospects, that choosing your solution is a way to do good and change the world for the better. But... don't lose sight of what's in it for them.

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                                                  Super pertinent points.

                                                   enemy is an idea (e.g. software, pollution, etc.) rather than another competitor.

                                                  and also

                                                  do good and change the world for the better.

                                                  I don't mean to be crass, but capturing on the latest & popular customer sentiments and wrapping that with your product is really useful.

                                                  'Hey' to be honest did just that - user privacy. There are other small startups that are trying to replace Google Analytics by providing good data without prying too much into the users on the website.

                                                  Definitely think that the "doing good" or "the right thing" aspect as a part of your product can be really useful.