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    Congrats on the launch Sigurd πŸ‘

    I will also add a blurb about it in the newsletter :)

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      Thank you! That means a lot, Hrishikesh!

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      Typeform did a survey on remote work (using Typeform, I assume). Interesting statistics. CEOs decline to answer too much :)

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        Found an interesting bit from the data- the lunch break seems to be almost non-existent while working from home.
        It could mean people aren't dedicating a specific interval for lunch or are eating while working or in the worst case have skipped lunch altogether πŸ€”.

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          Yeah, my suspicion is that they do what I do: since there usually is no-one having lunch with, I simply eat in front of the computer. Not sure if that is good or bad :)

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          Great share Sigurd. Loved 2 things about this - they have used data from their products to derive inferences about work patterns & the way data is presented.

          Most of the inferences are fairly obvious now given multiple other surveys have indicated the same. But I was intrigued to see the graphs by country of say, day length or finishing your work day later.

          Although they haven't mentioned the actual size of the dataset right or did I miss it altogether?

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            It didn't specifically say the size of the dataset, only that they have 'millions of users' generating data in the third paragraph.

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              Hmm, right. That's where I got a little confused. I thought they are quoting data only from their own internal teams. If this is basis their entire user data, then it's a huge dataset and the inferences become even more significant!

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            Love this thread.

            Superhuman led the change for a few things, in my opinion:

            1. Opinionated software - Doing things in a certain way only is most efficient e.g. use of keyboard, targeting inbox zero. Other cult products like Roam do the same.

            2. Focus only on the core problem & strip the rest - Superhuman's biggest enemy is Gmail, which has a very cluttered interface. They focused only on getting one thing right - helping you clear up emails in the fastest way.

            3. Back to command line & keyboard shortcuts - Most popular products do this now (e.g. Slack) and it's become evident that to be efficient, you have to interact with your app using commands. Amazing to see Tomo does it as well πŸ‘, I know Kitemaker by @kevinsimons-476 & @sigurdseteklev does the same. Would love to hear their thoughts on this too.

            4. User onboarding - Their conceirge onboarding became so famous that apps started getting pitched as 'Superhuman (onboarding) for X'. They were also probably the first to show that personalised onboarding can be done at scale.

            5. Game design - Rahul talks about building Superhuman as a game vs. business software. I feel this aspect is not talked about a lot, but is also a crucial factor in achieveing user delight for Superhuman.

            Moving forward, we will see more of opinionated software that solve problems for a niche do really well. Possibly become a cult like Superhuman or Roam. And in terms of immediate change, I feel command line & keyboard shortcuts will become a necessity 😎

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              I agree with Hrishikesh completely.

              Points 4 and 5 are very interesting. When I read about it, it made me think about how we approach those things in our company.

              There is a widespread belief in the tech industry that personalized onboarding is something bad (coming from Silicon Valley). Big part of the investors get concerned when we tell them that we work with the customers somewhat considerably (Customer Success function).

              I hope Superhuman impact this false belief.

              The guys/girls at Superhuman have my admiration for thinking independently on how to do things, figuring out a superior way for their case and standing firm behind it.

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                Absolutely Boris, we also faced a lot of heat initially when we used to talk about high number of manual touchpoints in the onboarding process. The skepticism was how do you scale it. Superhuman's actually done this really well.

                On point 5 i.e. game design, I like the concept in theory but it requires huge effort and may not apply to every product. Even at Remote Clan, we are always thinking of ways to add in gamification features which the Superhuman team is strongly against.

                Their rationale is gamification just motivates users to fight for rewards but doesn't really push them to have fun while using the product & then rave about it. This has turned out really well for Superhuman. But I believe an early-stage product or community could use that extra push from gamification rather than just banking on an amazing product/design & users raving about it.

                I am curious to know if and how you apply point 5 (game design principles) at RemoteMore. Would love to hear about it!

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                  About gamification -

                  I think of it as one way of adding delightfulness into the product. But there are also other ways. For example, if the page loads very fast, that in itself is also delightful. Another example is this gif from Mailchimp when the user clicks to send the campaign, and the campaign is sent.

                  I think that as a whole, delightfulness and visuals help, especially in a crowded industry (incl. B2B). But in my opinion, there are more important objectives to hit first - if those are considerably threatened (mostly due to lack of resources), then pretty much ignore the delightfulness part.

                  @hrishikesh

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                    But in my opinion, there are more important objectives to hit first - if those are considerably threatened (mostly due to lack of resources), then pretty much ignore the delightfulness part.

                    Haha, absolutely true words. Most times, you don't have the luxury of crafting delightful experiences from the word go due to constraints on budget, time, talent etc.

                    For example, if the page loads very fast, that in itself is also delightful. Another example is this gif from Mailchimp when the user clicks to send the campaign, and the campaign is sent.

                    Makes sense. The parallel from Superhuman is the background you see when you hit Inbox Zero. I have seen people say that they feel a sense of accomplishment & calmness when they hit inbox zero. It's an achievable goal set in the product which users aim for, very similar to the experience you have in games.

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                      Cool, thank you for sharing the screenshot!

                      It's a good example/lesson of what can be done in this area. πŸ™‚

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                Yeah, we have kind of gone into this path with Kitemaker. For us, the user onboarding we have put a little less emphasis on personal onboarding since we are making a collaboration tool we want the threshold of getting started as simple as possible. We do some personal onboarding, but I think you need quite good WOM traction to pull it off on the scale that Superhuman has done.

                Another point of hotkeys and opinionated software that sometimes gets overlooked is that having people invest in learning your tool (like Superhuman almost forces you to during onboarding) and that making them faster/more efficient is an effective way to reduce churn. Basically, when teams have spent the time learning the hotkeys, sees they work faster (some teams tell us that they have made a bit of sport in trying to find and learn new hotkeys in Kitemaker), they don't want to start using a less efficient tool, and they don't want to go through a similar investment again.

                The "Superhuman interface" model is not easy to pull off, and we have worked through many challenges both on design and the tech, and we're not near the goal yet :)

                But both of us are happy to share our experience :)

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                  Great & very relevant points Sigurd.

                  people invest in learning your tool (like Superhuman almost forces you to during onboarding) and that making them faster/more efficient is an effective way to reduce churn.

                  Absolutely. It's a huge ask from the user. Even for Superhuman, initially, you are supposed to have the onboarding call and also then get used to all the hotkeys. So it's surely tough to achieve, however as you said, once users are onboard fully and see efficiency gain, there's no turning back.

                  some teams tell us that they have made a bit of sport in trying to find and learn new hotkeys in Kitemaker

                  This is an amazing achievement πŸ‘We would love to know more on how you have gone about building Kitemaker. Would be lovely if you could share your posts or experience on the community.

                  To make it even easier, we recently added canonical URLs & do-follow links so you can repurpose existing/new content. I saw some amazing posts on your blog on Hashnode. Would love if you share relevant posts here too :)

                  Let me know if you need any help!

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                Great report!

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                  Backlinks are interesting, but I don't think they are new. We've had them in Kitemaker for a long time and I can't imagine this was an 'invention' at the time.

                  What I think is interesting is that backlinks allow you to create a graph connecting information. That is the edge Roam has over Notion, and what is really needed as information easily gets spread across folders and tools and hopeless to find (like search doesn't really work efficiently in Slack or any document tools, right?)

                  It is also where we want to take our tool in the context of discussions, tasks, and plans, but instead of keeping everything in one tool, we want to do it through integrations :)

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                    Absolutely. I think TiddlyWiki did it long time back, in 2004. Just that Roam's implementation of backlinks is great (or so I read, never really tried it out extensively).

                    That's really cool. I didn't know Kitemaker has backlinks, I am going to check that out. You guys have implemented some of the coolest features I know - hotkeys & backlinks :-)

                    Would also love to hear your experience with Roam once you try it out for a few days/ weeks. I'm also going to use it for my writing (posts/ blogs) and see how it goes.

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                    We use Notion as the only "writing tool" in our team, of course apart from Kitemaker where all of our product/task discussions happen. Notion basically fills the role of place for me to scribble stuff down for myself (notetaking) and place for the team to collaborate on things like blog posts, etc. that we're doing together. We don't really use it as a traditional wiki yet, though I assume we will as our team grows.

                    Things I like about Notion:

                    - Really nice editor

                    - Has everything I may need in terms of tables, images, etc. Even though no one feature is great, together they're all pretty alright

                    - Works well for commenting/discussions on documents

                    - Public docs mean we serve our "terms and conditions" and "privacy policy" right from Notion. No need to move them elsewhere for hosting (see https://kitemaker.co at the bottom to see what I mean)

                    That being said, if we didn't use it for our collaborative documents (in place of e.g. Google docs) I wouldn't bother to use it for notes. I just use it because I always have it open. I'd just use Notes in macOS as it's good enough and, like you said, is a simple choice compared to evaluating the myriad of options out there.

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                      Great points about Notion, I think that's pretty much our rationale for using Slite in our team (except for the public docs - we don't use it much).

                      I think the biggest problem with MacOS notes is its editor/ interface. Quite unintuitive & painful to use.

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                        To add to Kevins (and I'm definatley not the one that has this figured out):

                        For thinking and note-taking during meetings, I use an iPad with a pen and Notes. I don't share them and I like "writing" as it is more physical.Β 

                        I do have a daily todo list and personal documents to keep track of work as well (like Β lists of investors, resources/links if I'm working on something specific, etc.). However, I'm never able to stick with one tool for that. I often come back to MacOS Notes since I have my handwritten notes in the same place, but in periods I'm using Evernote since it allows me to structure my notes better. Right now I'm trying out Roam for this which is nice because it automatically sets up daily notes, but I'm missing a desktop app...

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                          I've never tried writing (or taking notes) with a stylus. Does it mimic the writing experience well? Also, any recommendation for an iPad stylus?

                          Exactly, that's also why I wanted to try out Roam (besides also seeing what the hype is all about). But yes, the non-existence of any app comes as a real blocker. I keep jotting down my thoughts on my phone in the Notion app or even native notes app. For Roam, I've to actually go to my desk.